Quintessence Roundup: April

Quintessence 2017 Catalog

New Titles in Books


The Art and Science of Contemporary Surgical Endodontics
(Book/DVD set)

Edited by Mahmoud Torabinejad and Richard Rubinstein

This book begins with a concise review of the basic science of tissues and then moves into diagnosis, treatment planning, and surgical procedures in endodontics, with an emphasis on the use of enhanced magnification, ultrasonic tips, microinstruments, newer root-end filling materials, and CBCT. Chapters on the maxillary sinus and its relation to surgical endodontics, soft and hard tissue healing, and adjunctive surgical procedures and considerations such as management of procedural accidents, resorption, root amputation, hemisection, replantation, transplantation, crown lengthening, grafting materials, and pharmacology are followed by an assessment of the outcomes of surgical endodontics based on current evidence. The accompanying DVDs present valuable videos demonstrating many of the procedures. These features provide the reader with a textbook that is concise, current, and easy to follow in an interactive manner. Written by a team of leading authorities and richly illustrated, this new compendium of state-of-the-art knowledge and protocols is essential reading for practicing endodontists and residents alike.

336 pp; 685 illus; ISBN 978-0-86715-731-4 (B7314); Special preorder price! US $158

 

Noncarious Cervical Lesions and Cervical Dentin Hypersensitivity: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment

Edited by Paulo V. Soares and John O. Grippo

Cervical dentin hypersensitivity (CDH) and noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs) are common findings in modern clinical practice. Although research has shown that NCCLs are a multifactorial condition involving the three mechanisms of stress, biocorrosion, and friction, few dentists know how to treat them effectively. Similarly, CDH has been an enigma for many years, and research has focused on etiology instead of treatment. In addition, little attention has been given to their mutual etiologic mechanisms of cervical stress concentration from occlusal loading and endogenous/exogenous biocorrosion. Therefore, this book approaches CDH and NCCLs together and outlines the history, mechanisms, and, most important, the clinical methods of treatment for these pathologies. It is about time we as dentists learn how to treat and prevent these conditions in clinical practice. This involves greater diagnostic effort and alteration of treatment protocols to (1) reduce dietary intake/exposure to acids, (2) manage reflux diseases, and (3) consider the significance of occlusal therapies. After reading this book, the student or clinician will be able to diagnose and treat clinical cases of NCCLs and CDH.

208 pp; 425 illus; ISBN 978-0-86715-714-7 (B7147); Now available! US $155

Read more about NCCLs and the group of researchers behind this book here!

EndoProsthodontics: A Guide for Practicing Dentists

Edited by Maciej Żarow

Written by renowned international experts in the field of restoration of endodontically treated teeth, this book details the endodontic, restorative, and esthetic principles of treating pulpless teeth. Topics include how to avoid fractures, endodontic retreatment versus extraction and implant placement, use of direct and indirect restoration, tooth whitening after endodontic treatment, use of fiber posts, treating subgingival defects, and use of porcelain veneers versus ceramic crowns. Each chapter includes detailed clinical cases, step-by-step descriptions of technical protocols, algorithms, and practical tips for everyday use.

324 pp; 1423 illus; ISBN: 978-83-85700-90-6 (B9451); US $106

 

New Issues in Journals


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Featured article: Subperiosteal Minimally Invasive Aesthetic Ridge Augmentation Technique (SMART): A New Standard for Bone Reconstruction of the Jaws
Ernesto A. Lee

Clinical and Histologic Evaluations of SLA Dental Implants
Myron Nevins, Stefano Parma-Benfenati, Franco Quinti, Prima Galletti, Cosmin Sava, Catalin Sava, and David M. Kim

Dynamic Documentation of the Smile and the 2D/3D Digital Smile Design Process
Christian Coachman, Marcelo Alexandre Calamita, and Newton Sesma

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Digital Design and Fabrication of Surgical Obturators Based Only on Preoperative Computed Tomography Data
Jeff Rodney and Ivan Chicchon

Bruxism: Is There an Indication for Muscle-Stretching Exercises?
Simone Gouw, Anton de Wijer, Nico H.J. Creugers, and Stanimira I. Kalaykova

Feasibility and Accuracy of Digitizing Edentulous Maxillectomy Defects: A Comparative Study
Mahmoud E. Elbashti, Mariko Hattori, Sebastian B.M. Patzelt, Dirk Schulze, Yuka I. Sumita, and Hisashi Taniguchi

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Featured Article: Are “Human Factors” the Primary Cause of Complications in the Field of Implant Dentistry?
Franck Renouard, René Amalberti, and Erell Renouard

Thematic Abstract Review: Immediate Implant Placement and Restoration: An Update
Guy Huynh-Ba

Extraoral Implants for Anchoring Facial Prostheses: Evaluation of Success and Survival Rates in Three Anatomical Regions
Heitor Batista dos Reis, Joaquim Augusto Piras de Oliveira, Vanessa Arias Pecorari, Shiva Raoufi, Márcio Abrahão, and Luciano Lauria Dib

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Interprofessional Education and Collaboration as an Approach to Overcoming Perceived Barriers in Improving Oral Health
Lorinda Coan and Amanda R. Reddington

Quality Resources for Clinical Decision Making: Part 4. Understanding the Flossing Controversy
JoAnn R. Gurenlian and Jane L. Forrest

Critical Thinking in Action: Consideration of Alternative Hypotheses
Donald M. Brunette

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Topical Review: Potential Use of Botulinum Toxin in the Management of Painful Posttraumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy
Nathan Moreau, Wisam Dieb, Vianney Descroix, Peter Svensson, Malin Ernberg, and Yves Boucher

Pain from Dental Implant Placement, Inflammatory Pulpitis Pain, and Neuropathic Pain Present Different Somatosensory Profiles
André Luís Porporatti, Leonardo Rigoldi Bonjardim, Juliana Stuginski-Barbosa, Estevam Augusto Bonfante, Yuri Martins Costa, and Paulo César Rodrigues Conti

Association Between Chronic Tension-Type Headache Coexistent with Chronic Temporomandibular Disorder Pain and Limitations in Physical and Emotional Functioning: A Case-Control Study
Rüdiger Emshoff, Felix Bertram, Dagmar Schnabl, and Iris Emshoff

Dental Meetings Quintessence Will Attend in April


6th Hawaii Mid Pacific Session
hosted by The International Congress of Dental Esthetics & Technology for Dentists & Dental Technicians
April 15–16 in Los Angeles, California

AACD 2017: Booth #607
hosted by the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry
April 18–21 in Las Vegas, Nevada

2017 AAO Annual Session: Booth #510
hosted by the American Association of Orthodontics
April 21–25 in San Diego, California

2017 Annual Scientific Session of the Academy of Prosthodontics
hosted by the Academy of Prosthodontics
April 25–29 in Sarasota, Florida

AAE17: Booth #939
hosted by the American Association of Endodontists, April 26–29 in New Orleans, Louisiana

Upcoming Quintessence Symposia


Posted in Books, Endodontics, Esthetic Dentistry, Implant Dentistry, International Journal of Evidence-Based Practice for the Dental Hygienist, Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache (formerly Journal of Orofacial Pain), Journals, Misc, Multidisciplinary, Multimedia, Periodontics, Prosthodontics, Research, Restorative Dentistry, Roundup, The International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants, The International Journal of Periodontics & Restorative Dentistry, The International Journal of Prosthodontics, What's New | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

NCCLs: How a Team of Researchers is Redefining How We Treat Them

Whether you’re a general dentist, dental hygienist, or a specialist, chances are you’ve seen one of these lesions. It’s also likely that if you researched causes and treatment options, you found a lot of contradicting literature. One team of researchers has made it their mission to cut through the fray and shed light on the etiology behind these lesions and offer practical, interdisciplinary treatment protocols for dental clinicians.

When Dr Paulo V. Soares encountered his first noncarious cervical lesion (NCCL) as a dental student in 1999, he was intrigued. This curiosity spurred him onto a path of research that has carried him through many unique disciplines, eventually leading him to found the NCCL Research Group at the Federal University of Uberlândia, Brazil.

“At the beginning of my career, I believed brushing and occlusal forces were the main causes of NCCLs,” Dr Soares recalls. “I did my master’s and PhD theses on biomechanical behaviors, and during that research I read many papers with different points of view about NCCLs. In 2008, I concluded my PhD where I observed high rates of failure for Class V restorations, and then I formed the NCCL Research Group.”

Today, the NCCL Research Group comprises 26 direct members and many more international collaborators from fields of study such as biomechanics, biochemistry, cellular biotechnology, psychology, nutrition, and gastric medicine, in addition to dental areas such as occlusion, endodontics, periodontics, prosthodontics, orthodontics, and operative dentistry. The group’s goal is to clarify the causes of NCCLs and cervical dentin hypersensitivity (CDH) and to explore treatment options that combat the causes of the lesions rather than mask the symptoms. Recently, the group’s research was gathered and developed into a book, Noncarious Cervical Lesions and Cervical Dentin Hypersensitivity: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment edited by Drs Soares and John O. Grippo.

The reason the NCCL Research Group is so diverse is that the treatment of NCCLs and the control of CDH require a multidisciplinary view and approach. For decades, dental management and treatment of NCCLs focused on occlusal mechanisms and interventions such as restorative or periodontal procedures and ignored many of the underlying etiologic factors. When these factors are left unexamined and untreated, Class V restorations fail and the cycle repeats itself.

“NCCLs and CDH require a complete analysis of a patient as a member of your respective context/society,” Dr Soares explained. “We need to teach clinicians and future professionals that we can’t analyze just the teeth or mouth.”

Note the severe NCCLs resulting from dentin degradation in this 50-year-old woman with a highly acidic diet. (Courtesy of the NCCL Research Group, Uberlândia, Brazil.)

Aggressive NCCLs on the palatal surface of the maxillary anterior teeth in this 45-year-old man with diagnosed but untreated GERD. The teeth look as though they have been prepared for a full-coverage restoration with a chamfered margin. (Courtesy of the NCCL Research Group, Uberlândia, Brazil.)

When the NCCL Research Group included the expertise of a variety of non-dental professionals and researchers, they were able to combine individual findings and opinions into a much broader overview of etiologic factors than was previously recognized by the dental industry. These factors include parafunctional habits and their connection to psychologic stress, systemic diseases such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), dietary components, and occupational effects.

The NCCL Research Group’s findings prove that when clinicians have a narrow view of NCCLs and CDH, they set themselves up for a narrow rate of success. The high failure rates of Class V restorations are related to incomplete comprehension of the causes and progression of these conditions. Adhesive restorations treat the lesion or hypersensitivity, but they don’t stop progression or solve the problems. The etiologic factors behind the progression of NCCLs naturally promote early failure and debonding of Class V restorations; however, if clinicians take a more holistic approach to evaluating the patient-specific factors, treatment plans can be redesigned to treat the underlying causes through nonrestorative techniques before tackling the restorative and/or surgical options to restore tooth structure and alleviate symptoms.

What Causes NCCLs and CDH?

NCCLs are related to three distinct and fundamental etiologic mechanisms: stress, friction, and biocorrosion. The micromorphology of the tooth structure, particularly how enamel prisms and dentinal tubules are oriented in the cervical region as opposed to the incisal region, directly influences the area of origin and progression of NCCLs. The enamel is also thinner and more brittle at the cervical region, making it more vulnerable to stress fractures as well as biocorrosion in this area.

(left) Biocorrosive abfraction ridges within the wedge-shaped NCCL resulting from variation in the location of the tensile stress concentration over time combined with a biocorrodent, resulting in a lesion with irregular morphology attributed to a changing fulcrum toward the apex of the tooth. (right) Clinical aspects of biocorrosive abfraction ridges, or “progression lines,” within the wedgeshaped NCCL.

Maxillary right quadrant of a patient with GERD and bruxism. Biocorrosion of the teeth has been accelerated by attrition and abrasion.

Some of the most visually dramatic NCCLs are wedge-shaped abfractive lesions, which occur when the force of stress concentration exceeds the tensile strength of the dental tissue, leading to micro- and macrofractures at the cervical region. The most potentially damaging forces occur during intercuspation of the teeth during lateral excursion or anterior slide from centric relation to maximal intercuspal position, either during normal function or parafunction. The direction of eccentric occlusal loading will affect the stress concentration and strain pattern. With this in mind, in some cases one of the warning signs of future NCCL development can be wear facets on the occlusal surfaces. Patients with parafunctional habits should be considered at risk for NCCLs and CDH and should be evaluated closely for disease progression.

Biocorrosive abfraction is greater on the facial than on the lingual due to the lack of serous saliva on the facial.

Further compounding the progression of NCCLs is the lack of saliva on buccal surfaces. When present in required amounts, saliva can neutralize biocorrosive exposures and, to a certain extent, repair and remineralize damage to the tooth structure. Potential biocorrosive exposures include dietary sources (eg, citrus fruits, soda, white wine) and occupational or recreational exposures, such as chlorine exposure for professional and recreational swimmers. The combination of stress and biocorrosion can cause more damage than either acting alone.

During a biocorrosive challenge, a chemical reaction occurs between an acid and the components of dental structures. Hydrogen ions released by the acids combine with carbonate and phosphate ions within the mineral crystals of the tooth structure, resulting in chemical degradation and etching. Enamel is more vulnerable to acid action than dentin due to its larger crystal size and porosity. Continuous exposure to acids will remove the smear layer, exposing vulnerable dentinal tubules and leading to CDH. Even when the strength of the acid challenge is not great enough to result in direct removal of the enamel layer, it can result in a thin, softened layer that can be further degraded by mechanical wear and abrasion.

List of acidic foods and drinks from most acidic to least acidic.

What Do the NCCL Research Group Findings Mean for Treatment Protocols?

The multidisciplinary composition of the NCCL Research Group enabled them to identify the numerous interrelated causes of NCCLs and CDH that, like the hidden bulk of icebergs, have long confounded clinicians. The incidence rate of NCCLs and CDH increase annually, and with it the rate of published articles that disagree on causes and treatments. By taking an interdisciplinary, holistic view of the problem, the NCCL Research Group has finally found the guide to a 1,000-piece puzzle—but now clinicians have to put it together for their patients.

Note the initial areas of enamel demineralization in the maxillary teeth of this 30-year-old woman with GERD. (Courtesy of the NCCL Research Group, Uberlândia, Brazil.)

“New generations of clinicians will need to change the way they view and treat these diseases,” Dr Soares advises. “Don’t believe that a Class V lesion is one more type of cavity in your patient’s mouth. Know that it is an NCCL and understand that the main factors could be the patient’s lifestyle or habits. Believe that subgingival CDH with or without gingival recession can be the first step of a future NCCL or even an incipient microscopic NCCL. Restoring the missing structure or recommending a desensitizing toothpaste does not complete treatment for your patient.”

Paulo V. Soares, DDS, MS, PhD
Professor and Coordinator of the NCCL Research Group and Public Ambulatory Center
Federal University of Uberlândia
Uberlândia, Brazil

Noncarious Cervical Lesions and Cervical Dentin Hypersensitivity: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment compiles the NCCL Research Group’s research and presents it in a way that is accessible to clinicians and enables them to view these two conditions holistically. Their findings make it imperative that clinicians understand the multifactorial mechanisms at work in order to lower the failure rate for Class V restorations and better manage this growing dental issue.

Posted in Books, Esthetic Dentistry, Misc, Prosthodontics, Research, Restorative Dentistry | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Mandibular Bone Block Harvesting from the Retromolar Region: A 10-Year Prospective Clinical Study

Congratulations to Dr Fouad Khoury, recipient of the 2017 William R. Laney Award! For a limited time read his award-winning article below as published in The International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants.

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Posted in Journals, Misc, Restorative Dentistry, The International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Quintessence Roundup: March

Quintessence 2017 Catalog

New Titles in Books


Noncarious Cervical Lesions and Cervical Dentin Hypersensitivity: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment

Edited by Paulo V. Soares and John O. Grippo

Cervical dentin hypersensitivity (CDH) and noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs) are common findings in modern clinical practice. Although research has shown that NCCLs are a multifactorial condition involving the three mechanisms of stress, biocorrosion, and friction, few dentists know how to treat them effectively. Similarly, CDH has been an enigma for many years, and research has focused on etiology instead of treatment. In addition, little attention has been given to their mutual etiologic mechanisms of cervical stress concentration from occlusal loading and endogenous/exogenous biocorrosion. Therefore, this book approaches CDH and NCCLs together and outlines the history, mechanisms, and, most important, the clinical methods of treatment for these pathologies. It is about time we as dentists learn how to treat and prevent these conditions in clinical practice. This involves greater diagnostic effort and alteration of treatment protocols to (1) reduce dietary intake/exposure to acids, (2) manage reflux diseases, and (3) consider the significance of occlusal therapies. After reading this book, the student or clinician will be able to diagnose and treat clinical cases of NCCLs and CDH.

208 pp; 425 illus; ISBN 978-0-86715-714-7 (B7147); Special preorder price! US $124

 

Tooth Preparations: Science & Art

Clovis Pagani

Well-executed cavity preparation remains the primary hallmark determining the success of indirect restorative procedures. This book details the basic principles and sequencing of cavity preparation and outlines the different preparation designs indicated for a variety of clinical situations. With a focus on biologic care, preservation of tooth structure, and precision, the author provides special guidance on incorporating these principles into daily practice, and the sections on instrumentation underscore how to improve clinical dexterity and concentration. By featuring sophisticated 3D illustrations throughout to detail each preparation design step by step, this book elevates this fundamental part of operative dentistry to an art form.

312 pp; 841 illus; ISBN 978-1-78698-001-4 (B9099); US $108

 

New Issues in Journals


prd_banner

Featured article: Subperiosteal Minimally Invasive Aesthetic Ridge Augmentation Technique (SMART): A New Standard for Bone Reconstruction of the Jaws
Ernesto A. Lee

Clinical and Histologic Evaluations of SLA Dental Implants
Myron Nevins, Stefano Parma-Benfenati, Franco Quinti, Prima Galletti, Cosmin Sava, Catalin Sava, and David M. Kim

Dynamic Documentation of the Smile and the 2D/3D Digital Smile Design Process
Christian Coachman, Marcelo Alexandre Calamita, and Newton Sesma

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A Critical Review of Search Strategies Used in Recent Systematic Reviews Published in Selected Prosthodontic and Implant-Related Journals: Are Systematic Reviews Actually Systematic?
Danielle Layton

Sociodemographic, Educational, Behavioral, and Psychologic Factors Underlying Orofacial Esthetics and Self-Reported Oral Health
Cristina Gómez Polo and Javier Montero

Determining Favorable Maxillary Implant Locations Using Three-Dimensional Simulation Software and Computed Tomography Data
Tomoya Gonda, Koichiro Kamei, and Yoshinobu Maeda

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Thematic Abstract Review: Dental Implants in the Posterior Mandible: Complications and Management
Emad W. Estafanous

A Novel Osseous Densification Approach in Implant Osteotomy Preparation to Increase Biomechanical Primary Stability, Bone Mineral Density, and Bone-to-Implant Contact
Salah Huwais and Eric G. Meyer

Long-Term Results of Peri-implant Conditions in Periodontally Compromised Patients Following Lateral Bone Augmentation
Philip L. Keeve and Fouad Khoury

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Interprofessional Education and Collaboration as an Approach to Overcoming Perceived Barriers in Improving Oral Health
Lorinda Coan and Amanda R. Reddington

Quality Resources for Clinical Decision Making: Part 4. Understanding the Flossing Controversy
JoAnn R. Gurenlian and Jane L. Forrest

Critical Thinking in Action: Consideration of Alternative Hypotheses
Donald M. Brunette

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Topical Review: Potential Use of Botulinum Toxin in the Management of Painful Posttraumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy
Nathan Moreau, Wisam Dieb, Vianney Descroix, Peter Svensson, Malin Ernberg, and Yves Boucher

Pain from Dental Implant Placement, Inflammatory Pulpitis Pain, and Neuropathic Pain Present Different Somatosensory Profiles
André Luís Porporatti, Leonardo Rigoldi Bonjardim, Juliana Stuginski-Barbosa, Estevam Augusto Bonfante, Yuri Martins Costa, and Paulo César Rodrigues Conti

Association Between Chronic Tension-Type Headache Coexistent with Chronic Temporomandibular Disorder Pain and Limitations in Physical and Emotional Functioning: A Case-Control Study
Rüdiger Emshoff, Felix Bertram, Dagmar Schnabl, and Iris Emshoff

Dental Meetings Quintessence Will Attend in March


AO Annual Meeting: Booth #500

hosted by the Academy of Osseointegration, March 15–18 in Orlando, Florida

ADEA Annual Session & Exhibition: Booth #730
hosted by the American Dental Education Association, March 18–21 in Long Beach, California

IADR/AADR/CADR General Session & Exhibition: Booth #310
hosted by the International Association for Dental Research, the American Association for Dental Research, and the Canadian Association for Dental Research, March 22–25 in San Francisco, California

 

Upcoming Quintessence Symposia


Posted in Books, Endodontics, Esthetic Dentistry, Implant Dentistry, International Journal of Evidence-Based Practice for the Dental Hygienist, Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache (formerly Journal of Orofacial Pain), Journals, Misc, Multidisciplinary, Multimedia, Periodontics, Prosthodontics, Research, Restorative Dentistry, Roundup, The International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants, The International Journal of Periodontics & Restorative Dentistry, The International Journal of Prosthodontics, What's New | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

February in Chicago: The Midwinter Meetings

Every year at the end of February, the city of Chicago fills with thousands of the world’s top dental professionals who come to the city to attend one of many simultaneous meetings. For the Quintessence Publishing Chicago office, this week represents an annual opportunity to interact with the brightest minds of dentistry, meet with some of our authors, and represent the Quintessence brand at large.

For Quintessence the week revolves around the Chicago Dental Society’s Midwinter Meeting, taking place this year from February 23 to 25. The CDS Midwinter Meeting is one of the top 3 dental meetings in the United States and one of the top 10 conventions in the city of Chicago. Nearly 600 exhibitors participate, making this meeting one of the largest exhibits of dental products and manufacturers in North America.

Quintessence also attends Lab Day Chicago, hosted by LMT Communications February 24 and 25. LMT Lab Day brings over 250 exhibitors and 4,000 laboratory owners, managers, and technicians to the city. Just across the Chicago River, we also set up shop at the American Academy of Fixed Prosthodontics’s Annual Scientific Session February 24 and 25. This educational program brings together speakers from myriad scientific and clinical backgrounds to present concepts and clinical techniques based on scientific evidence and their own expert experience.

The Midwinter meetings are a busy, wonderful time in Chicago when the dentists outnumber the taxi cabs, and the three meetings that Quintessence attends are just a few of the many taking place in the city during this time. Midwinter has become a beloved tradition for the city, for the dental community, and for Quintessence.

Midwinter Meetings Quintessence Will Attend


CDS 152nd Midwinter Meeting: Booth 4408
Thursday through Saturday, February 23–25 in Chicago, Illinois

LMT Lab Day Chicago: Table A-12
Friday and Saturday, February 24–25 in Chicago, Illinois

AAFP 66th Annual Scientific Session: Navigating New Frontiers in ProsthodonticsBooths 122 & 123
Friday and Saturday, February 24–25 in Chicago, Illinois

Posted in Books, Esthetic Dentistry, Implant Dentistry, Multidisciplinary, Prosthodontics, Restorative Dentistry | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment